THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF INVASIVE NON-TYPEABLE HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE (NTHI) DISEASE IN THE ERA OF ROUTINE HIB VACCINATION IN ENGLAND AND WALES
ESPID Education. Slack M. Jun 7, 2011; 7670 Disclosure(s): The presenter has received honoraria from GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals and Wyeth/Pfizer as a speaker and member of advisory boards and funding to attend scientific meetings/conferences
Dr. Mary Slack
Dr. Mary Slack

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Abstract
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Haemophilus influenzae can be differentiated into 6 capsular types (a-f) and non-typable (NTHi) strains. Prior to routine immunisation H.influenzae serotype b (Hib) accounted for >80% of invasive H.influenzae disease, mainly in children <5y. The Health Protection Agency (HPA) has been conducting enhanced population-based surveillance of invasive H.influenzae disease ( all types of H.influenzae in patients of all ages) in England and Wales since 1990. Following the introduction of routine Hib immunisation in the United Kingdom in 1992 invasive Hib disease has dramatically declined and NTHi are now the most common cause of invasive H.influenzae disease. This study describes the epidemiology of invasive NTHi infections in children <15y in England and Wales from 1994-2008.
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