EVOLUTION OF THE MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE´S INCIDENCE ON PAEDIATRIC NAVARRE´S POPULATION (NORTH OF SPAIN)
ESPID Education. Bernaola Iturbe E. Jun 7, 2011; 7704
Enrique Bernaola Iturbe
Enrique Bernaola Iturbe

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Abstract
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Introduction
The meningococcal disease is a clinical feature of low incidence but with a very important epidemiologic weight, because its high morbimortality
Objectives
- Analysis about evolution of invasive meningococcal disease´s (IMD) incidence on paediatric Navarre´s population.
- Evaluate changes on the IMD´s incidence on after introduction of the systematic vaccination against meningococcal C at the last months on 2000 year.
Methods
Population data was obtained from Census of Navarre.
Meningococcal disease data was obtained from the Navarre´s Institute of Public Health from January of 1987 to december of 2009.
Statistical analysis: Student T test, Chi Square test and binary logistic regression.
Results
We observed a global decrease in IMD´s incidence on our population from prevaccinal period(1987-2000) to postvaccinal(2001-2009), from 18,54 to 11,16c/10^5(OR:0,594; CI95%:0,463-0,763). This fall was due to the drop in cases of serogroup C(SGC) from 5,67 to 1,26c/10^5(OR:0,221;CI95%:0,110-0,444) and in non-grouped cases. On the contrary, the cases of serogroup B(SGB) increased on the postvaccination period(from 5,76 to 9,1c/10^5;OR:1,576;CI95%:1,13-2,198). When we stratified by ages and serogroups, we observed an important decrease in SGC incidence in younger groups: 0-5years(OR:0,033;CI95%:0,004-0,237) and 5-9years(from 3.56 to 0c/10^5). In these groups there were not significant rises in SGB incidence. In the other hand SGB incidence increase in older group(10-15years:OR:4,66;CI95%:1.20-18,04) with no significant fall in SGC incidence.
Conclusions
After the introduction of vaccination, there was a decrease in IMD´s incidence on paediatric population. However, the important fall of SGC cases on little children has been disguised by the increase of SGB cases on older groups.
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